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Key players of EDSA People Power

ABS-CBN News

Posted at Feb 20 2018 09:32 PM | Updated as of Feb 21 2018 10:35 AM

Who were the key players in the EDSA People Power movement 32 years ago? Here's a quick look at some of the personalities in the uprising that toppled the Marcos regime.

JUAN PONCE ENRILE

He was Ferdinand Marcos' defense minister and initially one of his close associates during martial law.

On February 22, 1986, he held a meeting in his home in Makati for a planned coup against Marcos. Hours after the plot was discovered, Enrile and then-senior military officer Fidel Ramos announced their defection from the Marcos regime.

"We're going to die here fighting," declared Enrile.

Source: Chronology of a Revolution by Angela Stuart-Santiago Fernando Sepe, Jr. ABS-CBN News

FIDEL V. RAMOS

He was the vice chief of staff of the Armed Forces of the Philippines and the chief of the Philippine Constabulary.

With Defense Minister Juan Ponce Enrile, he announced his defection from the regime and declared support for rebel soldiers.

On February 24, 1986, after hearing premature news that Marcos had left Malacañang, Ramos did a stage jump, which drew squeals of delight from the crowd.

Source: Chronology of a Revolution by Angela Stuart-Santiago Eggie Apostol Foundation

GRINGO HONASAN

He was chief security officer of the Ministry of National Defense when the 1986 People Power Revolution happened.

He was expected to lead an attack in Malacañang as part of Juan Ponce Enrile's planned coup against Ferdinand Marcos.

When he discovered that a Marine battalion was sitting exactly at their planned point of attack, it was already clear that they had been betrayed.

Source: Chronology of a Revolution by Angela Stuart-Santiago Mr. and Ms. Collection, American Historical Collection, Ateneo de Manila University

FABIAN VER

He was the chief of the Armed Forces of the Philippines and one of the most loyal allies of Ferdinand Marcos.

After learning about the planned coup, he fortified Malacañang's security and on February 24, 1986, he ordered an all-out attack against the rebel forces.

Loyal to the very end, Ver, along with his family, fled with the Marcoses to Hawaii.

Source: Chronology of a Revolution by Angela Stuart-Santiago Romeo Gacad, AFP

JAIME CARDINAL SIN

He was the archbishop of Manila during the Marcos regime.

After the defection of Juan Ponce Enrile and Fidel Ramos, the Cardinal spoke through Radio Veritas and called on the people to gather on EDSA.

Source: Chronology of a Revolution by Angela Stuart-Santiago Robyn Beck, AFP

NUNS VS TANKS

Clutching rosaries and roses, Sisters Maribel Carceller, Digna Dacanay, and Edy Talastas of the Religious of the Sacred Heart, along with many other nuns and clergy, joined the throngs of people who faced tanks and armed soldiers during the four-day uprising.

They distributed food for soldiers and rebels alike.

Photo credit: Communication Foundation for Asia

JUNE KEITHLEY AND COMPANIONS

When Radyo Veritas was shut down, Jaime Cardinal Sin asked Fr. James Reuter to find another transmitter. The team moved to use the dzRJ facilities, but instead of using 810, they used Radio Veritas' 840 kilohertz and "Radyo Bandido" was born.

They invited June Keithley, who delivered a blow-by-blow reportage of the uprising from an undisclosed location.

Source: Chronology of a Revolution by Angela Stuart-Santiago Communication Foundation for Asia

CORAZON AQUINO AND SALVADOR LAUREL

Corazon "Cory" Aquino was the widow of Sen. Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino Jr., one of the staunchest critics of the Marcos regime.

When then-President Marcos called for snap elections in February 1986, she was the opposition's presidential candidate, with UNIDO's Salvador "Doy" Laurel as her running mate.

On the fourth day of the uprising, Aquino and Laurel took their oath as president and vice president, respectively, at the Club Filipino in San Juan.

Source: Chronology of a Revolution by Angela Stuart-Santiago Eggie Apostol Foundation

FERDINAND AND IMELDA MARCOS

As opposition to his regime grew, Ferdinand Marcos called for a snap election in 1986 and the Comelec declared him the winner. It was followed by protests which led to what is now known as the "EDSA People Power revolution."

On the fourth day of the uprising, the Marcoses fled the country to Hawaii.

The dictator died in 1989, and two years after, his wife Imelda was allowed to return to the Philippines.

Source: Chronology of a Revolution by Angela Stuart-Santiago Malacañang Palace, AFP Handout